I want to encourage you to knot yarn together with needles to create a wearable item to cover yourself and others.



The 2 Stitch Counts in Every Row or Round of Your Knitting Pattern

If you are designing a knitting pattern, every row or round of a knitting pattern technically has 2 stitch counts! Being able to identify these 2 stitch counts for the rows or rounds of your knitting is crucial to designing and writing a knitting pattern without errors. It’s one of the areas a tech editor will help you check when they edit your pattern. Let me explain! 😊

At the beginning of a row or round, there need to be a certain number of stitches present on the needles to work the pattern. In a pattern row that states, “Knit 5, K2tog,” 7 stitches need to be present, 5 to knit and 2 to knit together. We say this row is worked over 7 stitches.

Stitches Worked Over

The number of stitches needed to work the stitch pattern for a row or round of a knitting pattern.

At the end of a row or round, there is the number of stitches that working the pattern results in. This number is often stated in the final knitting pattern especially after the stitch count has been changed after increasing or decreasing. In the pattern row, “”Knit 5, K2tog,” working the row results in 6 stitches, 5 were knit and 2 stitches were decreased to 1 stitch by knitting 2 together.

Stitches Resulting In

The number of stitches that working a row or round of a knitting pattern results in.

For those interested in a more detailed understanding, let me guide you through a couple rounds of an example knitting pattern and demonstrate why these stitch counts matter so much.

Round 5: K12, SSK, YO, K1, YO, K2tog, K12, SSK, YO, K1, YO, K2tog, K12.

Stitches Worked Over

In round 5 of this pattern, the number of stitches worked over is 46 stitches.

K12 (12) + SSK (2) + YO (0) + K1 (1) + YO (0) + K2tog (2) + K12 (12) + SSK (2) + YO (0) + K1 (1) + YO (0) + K2tog (2) + K12 (12) = 46 stitches

Both Slip, Slip, Knit (SSK) and Knit 2 Together (K2tog) take 2 stitches to work. A Yarn Over (YO) takes 0 stitches to work.

Stitches Resulting In

Also, in round 5, working the pattern results in 46 stitches

K12 (12) + SSK (1) + YO (1) + K1 (1) + YO (1) + K2tog (1) + K12 (12) + SSK (1) + YO (1) + K1 (1) + YO (1) + K2tog (1) + K12 (12) = 46 stitches

Both Slip, Slip, Knit (SSK) and Knit 2 Together (K2tog) take 2 stitches and decrease to make 1 stitch. A Yarn Over (YO) takes 0 stitches to be worked and adds 1 stitch.

In this round, though increases and decreases are being made, they balance each other allowing the number of stitches worked over and the number of stitches resulting in round 5 to be the same.

This is not always the case, and often a row or round in a knitting pattern will result in a different number of stitches than the number of stitches worked over. Here’s an example!

Round 6: P12, SSP, P1, P2tog, P12, SSP, P1, P2tog, P12.

In this next round, the number of stitched worked over is 46 stitches.

P12 (12) + SSP (2) + P1 (1) + P2tog (2) + P12 (12) + SSP (2) + P1 (1) + P2tog (2) + P12 (12) = 46 stitches

This is important because the number of stitches worked over in a row/round needs to be equal to the number of stitches that resulted in the previous row/round.

In round 6, the number of stitches that result from working the pattern round is 42 stitches.

P12 (12) + SSP (1) + P1 (1) + P2tog (1) + P12 (12) + SSP (1) + P1 (1) + P2tog (1) + P12 (12) = 42 stitches

For round 7 of the pattern, 42 stitches should be the number of stitches the pattern works over. If the pattern is worked over a different number of stitches than resulted from the previous round, there will be extra or not enough stitches present on the needle to work the pattern.

Did you know the difference between the stitches worked over in a pattern and the number of stitches working the pattern results in? ❤️

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: